Testing Plastics

 

We were advised to scan different types of polymers to better understand the device. Polymers are thin and have good reflectance, thus giving  good consistent output as it’s easily measurable. Scanning polymers is also convenient because it would be easy to scan on the FTIR Spectrometry machine in the lab in the Chemical Engineering faculty.

Materials we scanned:

  • Cellofaan (Cellophane)

cello

4

  • PPS

pps

1

  • PI (1)

pi1

5

  • PI (2)

PI2

7

  • PEI

pei

6

  • PP (1)

pp1

3

  • PP (2)

pp2

2

We also scanned 47 times to check if the output will remain constant:

 

Screenshot_2015-10-27-00-05-42

Findings:

  1. Each of the polymers were scanned 3 times. From that we observed the following:
  • Looking at the different graphs from all the scans we can see differences in the graphs with different materials.
  • The three lines from the three scans correspond with each other, but most of the times one line does differ more. The line of result that differs mostly has the same shape but is moved up a  bit. It lags behind so to say.

2.  After scanning PP for 47 times, we found that:

  • The results have a very big fluctuation. it is a complete blur of lines. It seems like a very unreliable set of results.
  • When looking at the graph at a different size, the results make some sense.
  • You can see that the results of 2 different scans are the same material.

The next step’s to scan all of the above with the FTIR Spectrometry machine in the lab.

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